medicare part a icon

Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance)

Most people eligible for Medicare are entitles to Part A for free. This is because you or your spouse paid Medicare taxes while working.  If you aren’t eligible for free Part A, you can buy Medicare Part A if:

 You’re 65 or older, and you have (or are enrolling in) Part B and meet the citizenship and residency requirements.

• You’re under 65, disabled, and your premium-free Part A coverage ended because you returned to work. (If you’re under 65 and disabled, you can continue to get premium-free Part A for up to 8 1/2 years after you return to work.)

What's the Medicare Part A Enrollment Penalty?

If you did not get automatically enrolled or sign up during your Medicare Initial Enrollment Period, you will have a late penalty for Part A. The late penalty is 10% of the current Part A premium. You will continue to pay the higher premium for twice the number of years you were eligible for Part A but did not sign up.

 

Example: If you were eligible for Medicare Part A for 2 years but didn’t sign up, you’ll have to pay a 20% higher premium for 4 years. Typically, you won't pay a penalty if you meet certain conditions that allow you to sign up for Part A during a Special Enrollment Period.

 

What Does Medicare Part A Cover?

For 2016, the annual Part A deductible is $1,288. After the deductible Medicare Part A helps cover:

Inpatient care in a hospital
Inpatient care in a skilled nursing facility (not custodial or long-term care)
Hospice care
Home health care
Inpatient care in a religious nonmedical health care institution

medicare part a icon

Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance)

Most people eligible for Medicare are entitles to Part A for free. This is because you or your spouse paid Medicare taxes while working.  If you aren’t eligible for free Part A, you can buy Medicare Part A if:

 You’re 65 or older, and you have (or are enrolling in) Part B and meet the citizenship and residency requirements.

• You’re under 65, disabled, and your premium-free Part A coverage ended because you returned to work. (If you’re under 65 and disabled, you can continue to get premium-free Part A for up to 8 1/2 years after you return to work.)

What's the Medicare Part A enrollment penalty?

If you did not get automatically enrolled or sign up during your Medicare Initial Enrollment Period, you will have a late penalty for Part A. The late penalty is 10% of the current Part A premium. You will continue to pay the higher premium for twice the number of years you were eligible for Part A but did not sign up.

 

Example: If you were eligible for Medicare Part A for 2 years but didn’t sign up, you’ll have to pay a 20% higher premium for 4 years. Typically, you won't pay a penalty if you meet certain conditions that allow you to sign up for Part A during a Special Enrollment Period.

 

What Does Medicare Part A Cover?

For 2016, the annual Part A deductible is $1,288. After the deductible Medicare Part A helps cover:

Inpatient care in a hospital
Inpatient care in a skilled nursing facility (not custodial or long-term care)
Hospice care
Home health care
Inpatient care in a religious nonmedical health care institution